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Blackpool EV strategy: Draft for consultation

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This report has been prepared by City Science Corporation Limited with reasonable skill, care and diligence. This report is confidential to Blackpool Council and should not be shared with any third parties, nor reproduced in whole or in part, without the prior written approval of City Science Corporation Limited.

1 Executive Summary

1.1 The Problem

In 2020, the Government announced that the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and Light Goods Vehicles (LGVs) would be phased out by 2030, and the sale of new hybrids by 2035. Since this announcement, Blackpool Council has been receiving a growing number of enquiries about Electric Vehicle (EV) charge point provision.

To date, the private sector has failed to provide an adequate number of charge points. Available data indicates that the town is underprovided for chargepoints, with evidence that at least one site in private use has been inoperable for a number of years. If the town continues to be inadequately prepared for the EV transition, it risks having a detrimental impact on the visitor economy, thereby impacting the economic well-being of the town. Mitigating this risk is one of the key purposes of this Strategy.

1.2 The Solution

This Strategy aims to help future proof the town by forecasting anticipated charge point needs over the next five years, identifying who the key delivery partners are, potential sites and how charge points can be delivered. Predicting demand is particularly difficult in Blackpool, as the data models available based on the national or regional pictures tend to over-estimate the likely take up in Blackpool. We therefore propose treating the forecasts of anticipated charge point demand with caution. At the same time, however, we recognise that EVs are coming and that over the five-year lifetime of this Strategy we expect significant changes to the EV market and the uptake of EVs in the town. For instance, we expect the price of EVs to become comparable with the cost of a new Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle and for EVs to become more affordable to a range of household incomes, as the second-hand market evolves.

Following the release of the Government’s EV Infrastructure Strategy there is also a heightened focus on the important role that Local Authorities play in supporting delivery of charge points, including a significant amount of funding (£500m) ear marked to enable Local Authority delivery. The evidence provided in this Strategy provides a compelling case for charge point investment in Blackpool, one which will be leveraged through an ongoing dialogue including with both central Government and Charge Point Operators (CPOs). Particularly, given the focus on the Levelling Up agenda, there is a strong and compelling case for charge point investment in Blackpool. As the data indicates, the town has largely been overlooked by public and private sector investment in charge point provision to date. This is an item the Strategy plans to address.

1.3 Value

There is a myriad of benefits presented by this Strategy and its vision of improving charge point provision in Blackpool. This includes:

  • Environment: Supporting the net zero agenda given that transport is responsible for 19% of the towns carbon emissions
  • Economic: Future proofing the town to ensure it does not get left behind as the UK transitions to zero emission vehicles
  • Inclusion: Strategic direction and active leadership from Blackpool Council will support the inclusive provision of charge points. For instance, helping ensure that the transition to EVs is not biased towards wealthier drivers and areas (e.g. through developing plans to provide on-street residential charge points to residents without off-street parking - a group largely underrepresented in EV uptake to date)

1.4 Conclusion

To support and enable the delivery of the vision outlined in this Strategy, Blackpool Council has committed to the following four key priorities:

  1. Support and enable delivery of charge points on Council owned land: Including at council owned car parks and rolling out on-street residential charging solutions for residents without off-street parking
  2. Leverage funding and financing from the public and private sector to maximise charge point delivery: Blackpool Council will pursue funding and financing opportunities with central Government and the private sector to maximise delivery of charge points
  3. Harness its planning influence: A significant number of large developments are planned in Blackpool. The Planning Team will work closely with developers to ensure that development sites commit to and deliver the maximum number of charge points within viability constraints
  4. Raise awareness about the EV transition and secure buy-in from key stakeholders to support charge point delivery: The Council recognises it has an important role to play in raising awareness about EVs and charge points amongst residents, the local business community and with visitors. The Council will therefore utilise the tools at its disposal including the Council website to signpost the local community to grants and support. It will also actively engage with the business community including visitor attractions, the hotel industry, supermarkets and car park operators to share the vision outlined in this Strategy, and to outline the important role these sectors can play in supporting charge point delivery on their land

Blackpool Council deliver the vision outlined in this Strategy alone. To support this, the Council commits to utilising the forecasts of anticipated demand as an evidence base to secure inward investment from both central Government and the private sector. Given the current level of takeup amongst local residents, which is significantly lower than the national average, the proposed strategy seeks to keep pace with, rather than drive, the adoption of electric vehicles.

In the short term, the priority is for Blackpool Council to work with key delivery partners to significantly increase the number of charge points available in the town, to provide a range of charge point infrastructure and to build internal knowledge and expertise on charge points. The Council commit to tracking and measuring progress via reviewing the priority actions outlined in the EV Action Plan (see section 9.2) on an annual basis, to be reported to the Tourism, Economy and Communities Scrutiny Committee.

2 Introduction

2.1 Overarching Context & Purpose

City Science has been commissioned by Blackpool Council to produce a five-year EV Strategy to 2027, for the town. The purpose of this Strategy is to forecast the anticipated public charging needs of cars, vans and motorcycles, in order to help Blackpool (as a region) prepare for the transition to zero emission vehicles. It will support delivery of the actions set out in Blackpool’s Climate Action Plan, and the Council’s Climate Emergency declaration and associated net zero carbon pledge. It will also ensure that the town’s visitor economy can continue to serve the widest possible tourism market.

Blackpool’s EV Strategy is highly anticipated by the Council, for setting out how much and what type of charging infrastructure is required to meet the current and future needs of the town and the town’s visitors. Following the Government’s 2020 announcement that the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and LGVs will be phased out by 2030, and the sale of new hybrids by 2035, the Council has been receiving a growing number of EV infrastructure related enquiries from residents. The Government has not yet formally announced a date for the phasing out of the sale of new petrol and diesel motorcycles which was subject to consultation in 2021.

During development of this Strategy, the Government released their EV Infrastructure Strategy[1] which recognises the crucial role of Local Authorities in supporting the transition to zero emission vehicles. This Strategy outlines support for Councils and at least a further £500m of funding to support Local Authorities to plan and deliver local public charging infrastructure, with a particular focus on local on-street residential charging. A key purpose of the strategy is to provide an evidence base to support inward investment (from both central Government and the private sector) in order to work towards meeting Blackpool’s estimated charge point needs to 2027.

2.2 Purpose of this Report

The purpose of the Final EV Summary Report is to consolidate the key findings and recommendations outlined in separate reports (our Baseline Evidence Report; Data Analysis & Forecasting Report; Infrastructure Delivery Report; and the Stakeholder Engagement Summary Report). In this Final Report we will set out Blackpool Council’s vision, estimate Blackpool’s EV infrastructure needs over the next five years, and consider how this can be delivered.

Key outputs of the Final Report will include consolidating the recommendations (from across the four previous reports); proposing the role and responsibilities of key stakeholders (including the Council); and development of a short-term action plan for Blackpool Council, which will provide a framework for tracking progress against priority actions.

2.3 Report Structure

Following this chapter, this Report has been structured as follows:

  • Chapter 4: Setting the Vision
  • Chapter 5: Context
  • Chapter 6: Blackpool’s Anticipated Charge Point Needs
  • Chapter 7: Delivery Opportunities & Options
  • Chapter 8: Roles & Responsibilities
  • Chapter 8: Key Recommendations
  • Chapter 9: Key Commitments
  • Chapter 10: Conclusions & Next Steps

2.4 Vehicle Types

For the purposes of this Report, the following vehicle types are considered:

  • Motorcycles (Powered Two Wheelers)
  • Cars
  • Vans (LGVs, up to 3.5 tonnes)

 

For consistency and clarity, we will use the following terms and classifications throughout this Report:

  • Internal Combustion Engines (ICE): Vehicles which are fuelled by fossil fuels (e.g. petrol and diesel)
  • Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs): A car or van that emits less than 75g/km CO2 from the tailpipe for every km travelled[2] (it is anticipated that this definition will change to 50g/km shortly to reflect advances in technology)
  • Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs): A pure EV (with no fossil fuel engine capabilities)
  • Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): An EV which can run on fossil fuels or battery power

2.5 Blackpool Context & Study Area

Study area
Figure 2‑1: Study Area

Blackpool is a large seaside town located in Lancashire in North West England. Blackpool is a Unitary Authority, having the equivalent powers of both a County Council and District Council and covers an area of 13.5 square miles. The geographical area of this Strategy follows the boundary of the town (see Figure 2‑1). Blackpool boundary sits within a larger metropolitan area stretching along the Fylde Coast and is one of the most densely populated authorities in the UK outside London. Blackpool is England’s largest and most visited seaside resort attracting around 6.8 million adult visitors in 2019[3]. It is the main retail, public administration, cultural and service centre for the Fylde Coast (Blackpool, Fylde and Wyre).

Whilst Blackpool remains at the heart of the UK tourism and visitor economy, it has experienced a significant decline since the 1980s, leaving a wake of low-quality housing stock and challenges finding space for development, as well as creating high levels of deprivation with many low paid or unemployed families. Like many coastal resorts, Blackpool now faces a series of significant social challenges that will require significant social investment to reverse.

3 Setting the Vision

Chapter at a Glance

This chapter sets out Blackpool Council’s vision, which provides a strong signal of the Council’s commitment to decarbonising the town and supporting zero emission road transport.

3.1 Introduction

Blackpool’s EV Strategy recognises the importance of anticipating and providing sufficient charging infrastructure to support the electrification of road transport. This has become particularly pertinent since the Government announced plans to phase out the sale of new ICE cars and vans from 2030. It is also important given Blackpool Council’s commitments to making both the Council and the town net zero by 2030, given that transport contributes to 19% of Blackpool’s carbon emissions[4].

3.2 Blackpool Council’s Vision

The purpose of this Strategy is to ensure that Blackpool has an adequate provision of charge points as EV uptake gains pace over the next five years. Given Blackpool’s socio-economic context the Council acknowledge that Blackpool will not be at the forefront of EV adoption, however it is also recognised that the visitor economy is vital to the town and that actively engaging and supporting the fleet electrification agenda helps future proof the town, so that it can retain its position as a well-visited seaside resort - whilst also responding to the charge point needs of residents and commuters.

To date, the private sector has failed to deliver an adequate number of charge points in Blackpool. This Strategy will therefore outline opportunities to deliver more charge points in Blackpool via identifying who the key delivery partners are, potential sites and delivery mechanisms, e.g. business models. It is recognised that Blackpool Council has insufficient resources to address the EV infrastructure challenge alone, therefore collaboration across the public and private sector will be key to successful delivery.

3.3 Blackpool Council’s Priorities

In developing this Strategy, we have identified four clear priorities for Blackpool Council:

  1. Support and enable delivery of charge points on Council owned land: Including at council owned car parks and rolling out on-street residential charging solutions for residents without off-street parking. Any internal funding Blackpool Council can secure will be utilised to address strategic gaps in charge point provision
  2. Leverage funding and financing from the public and private sector to maximise charge point delivery: Blackpool Council does not have the resources to deliver this vision alone and will therefore actively foster relationships and pursue funding and financing opportunities with central Government and the private sector to maximise delivery of charge points
  3. Harness its planning influence: A significant number of large developments are planned in Blackpool. The Planning Team will work closely with developers to ensure that development sites commit to and deliver an adequate number of charge points
  4. Raise awareness about the EV transition and secure buy-in from key stakeholders to support charge point delivery: The Council recognises it has an important role to play in raising awareness about EVs and charge points amongst residents, the local business community and with visitors. The Council will therefore utilise the tools at its disposal including the Council website to signpost the local community to grants and support. It will also actively engage with the business community including visitor attractions, the hotel industry, supermarkets and car park operators to share the vision outlined in this Strategy, and to outline the important role these sectors can play in supporting charge point delivery on their land

Over the five-year lifetime of this Strategy, the priority is to enable and deliver a significant number of charge points across Blackpool to meet visitor, resident and commuter needs. In order to adequately respond to the range of user needs we propose that Blackpool deliver a range of charge point speeds (slow, fast and rapid/ultra-rapids), at a variety of locations (on- and off-street).

Whilst supporting fleet electrification is the key purpose of this Strategy, we acknowledge that it is secondary to sustainable transport. Blackpool is proud of its good public transport connections, which supports relatively low levels of car ownership and delivery of the net zero agenda. However, we also recognise that not everyone can walk, cycle or use public transport for all trips. The purpose of this Strategy is to therefore ensure that where people do need to travel by car, van or motorcycle that they are provided with appropriate access to charge points (if needed).

3.4 Key Principles

In our Baseline Evidence Report we identified the following four key principles which have been embedded into develop of this Strategy:

  1. Mode Shift: Acknowledging that walking, cycling and public transport are the preferred means of travel, and fundamental to delivery of the net zero ambition
  2. Accessibility: Ensuring the approach for charging infrastructure is accessible and does not impede access to the footway, including for wheelchair users, the visually impaired and people with pushchairs. As a minimum OZEV’s Design Considerations Best Practice Guidance for charge points will be adhered to[5] with further consideration of additional measures to support the use of chargers by people with physical disabilities on a site-by-site basis.
  3. Inclusion & Affordability: Meeting the needs of all users and ensuring that the transition to EVs is not biased towards wealthier drivers and areas. This includes providing affordable charging solutions, particularly for residents without off-street parking
  4. Reliability & Ease of Use: The vision is for a reliable network of charge points, which are easy to identify and provide an easy-to-use payment mechanism

4 Context

Chapter at a Glance


This chapter recognises the broader context within which this Strategy is being developed and outlines the key considerations which were identified during development of our Baseline Evidence Report.

4.1 Introduction

This chapter recognises that this Strategy has been developed in response to the broader national and local context, both of which inform and influence development and delivery of this Strategy.

4.2 National Context

The national net zero and transport decarbonisation agenda is driving forward the transition to zero emission vehicles. This includes the announcement of the phasing out of the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles from 2030 and the recent publication of the Government’s EV Infrastructure Strategy which presents attractive funding propositions to Local Authorities via the £500m of funding to support Local Authorities to plan and deliver local public charging infrastructure. An important role of this Strategy is providing an evidence base (including via the forecasts) to support Blackpool’s funding bids to Government.

4.3 Local context

Blackpool Council has a firm commitment to addressing the Climate Emergency, including:

  • Declaring a climate emergency (June 2019)
  • Committed to achieving net zero carbon emissions and 100% clean energy use by 2030 for the Council (September 2021)
  • Committed to achieving net zero by 2030 for the town (September 2021)
  • Launched Blackpool’s Climate Emergency Action Plan (September 2021)
    • Published in September 2021, the Climate Emergency Action Plan has ten key themes:
    • Housing; Buildings and the Built Environment; Transport (which includes reference to an Electric Vehicle Strategy), Getting Around and Digital; Power and Heat; Cleansing, Food, Water and Waste; Community Leadership, Communication and Involvement; Working With Others; Business; Natural Environment; and Building Knowledge, Capacity and Financial Resources.
    • Other key strategies include the Local Plan Parts One and Two, which include details of expected provision of charging infrastructure in new developments; the Local Transport Plan 2021-23, an interim plan prior to the subsequent Local Transport Plan (Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council and Lancashire County Council), which should set out a transport decarbonisation plan to support delivery of net zero via the importance of both mode shift and the transition to zero emission vehicles at the tail pipe; Highways Road Asset Management Strategy and the associated forthcoming Road Resilience Strategy. There are further clear links to the Destination Management Plan and Town Centre Strategy, and Lancashire County Council’s joint Electric Vehicle Strategy currently in development with Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council.

4.4 Population & demographics

As outlined in our Baseline Evidence Report, Blackpool is the most densely populated area in Lancashire and third in the North West. Spatial analysis of resident population density shows high populations of residents around the centre of Blackpool, with additional pockets of high population density around Little Carleton in the east and South Shore to the south. Capitalising on this population density via the targeted provision of charge points is something which can be considered as charge point locations are selected.

Another key consideration for this Strategy is Blackpool’s greater older population (20.4% of the total population) and proportion of people with a long-term health problem or disability (25.6% of the total population) at the last Census[6]. As charge points are rolled out, the needs of an older population and people with mobility needs must be considered at the forefront, to ensure the approach is inclusive and that charge points are accessible to all.

4.5 Deprivation

Our Baseline Evidence Report identified that Blackpool ranks as the most deprived authority in England based on rank average Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) score and concentration of deprivation measures from the 2019 English Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD)[7]. Using the domains of deprivation, Blackpool is the most deprived with regards to employment and health, deprivation and disability based on rank of average score.

Deprivation is relevant to this Strategy as early EV adopters have typically been wealthier households who can afford the premium cost of an EV. We aimed to develop an approach to EV infrastructure provision which is inclusive and does not reinforce existing inequalities. We also recognise that, over the five-year timeframe of this Strategy, we expect the price of EVs to become comparable with the cost of a new ICE vehicle. Estimates by the main manufacturers vary, with some claiming that by the end of this strategy price parity will have been achieved, albeit that the 2022 cost of living crisis and inflation rates have created greater uncertainty. We also expect the second-hand vehicle market for EVs to develop, and for EVs to become more affordable to a range of household incomes, particularly as the second-hand market evolves and vehicles become more affordable to a range of household incomes. Nevertheless, in the time frame of this document, the vast majority of new and second hand cars in Blackpool will be petrol or diesel.

4.6 Types of Charge Point User Groups

In Blackpool there are three main types of charge point users (residents, visitors and employees), as set out in Table 4‑1.

Types of charger points
Charge Point UsersUser Needs

Residents

Consisting of residents who:

· Park on-street (on a public road)

· Park off-street (e.g. on a driveway)

Visitors

As previously outlined (see section 1.1), millions of tourists visit Blackpool by car each year. As EV ownership rises it will become increasingly important to provide sufficient charging infrastructure to respond to their needs

Commuters

Consisting of:

· The significant number of people who travel to Blackpool for work (15,854 at the time of the 2011 Census[8])

· Businesses with EVs in their fleets which will require access to charging infrastructure

Table 4‑1: Summary of Charge Point Users & Needs

4.7 Types of Charge Points

To support EV uptake for Blackpool residents, tourists, commuters and businesses, access to convenient charge points that offer suitable charging speeds is required. Table 4‑2 summarises the four main EV charging types and their attributes[9].

Types of charger points
Slow ChargingFast ChargingRapid ChargingUltra-Rapid Charging

Power

3.6 kW (AC)

7 kW to 22 kW (AC)

DC units up to 50 kW. AC units up to 45 kW

100 kW to 350 kW (DC)

Charging Duration

Depending on battery capacity and speed, fully charges small/medium vehicles in between 18-24 hours.

5 to 8 hours to fully charge. Most home EV chargers are 7kw

24 to 60 minutes for an 80% charge for a standard battery size

Typically, 20 to 40 minutes for an 80% charge

Suitable Locations

Emergency charging at domestic residences, long stay car parks

Supermarket car parks, on-street, short and long stay public car parks, shopping centres

Motorway service stations, short stay parking bays & major roads

Motorway service stations & major roads

Connector Type

3-Pin plug

Type 1, Type 2

CHAdeMO, CCS, Tesla Type 2

CHAdeMO, CCS, Tesla Type 2

Table 4‑2: EV Charging Types & Attributes (Source: City Science)

4.8 Charge Point Location

Charge points should be located to respond to the needs of the different user groups. As user needs tend to vary, a mix of charge point locations are required to respond to different user needs. Table 4‑3 outlines the types of locations charge points tend to be located at.

Charger point location
Charge Point LocationDetails

Off-Street Home Charging

Residents with access to off-street charging (e.g. a driveway) can install dedicated home chargers, with peer-to-peer charging via apps such as Co Charger an option, which could meet some visitor, resident and commuter demand

On-Street Home Charging

Residents without off-street parking are dependent on public charging solutions, including on-street residential charging solutions. Many Local Authorities have rolled out on-street residential solutions (including lamppost chargers and free-standing charge points) to support the needs of these households. Some, including Lancashire CC, are trialling “gulleys” which eliminate potential trip hazards and allow cars to be charged via domestic power supplies

Workplace Charging

Employers may provide charge points to enable staff to charge their vehicle during the working day. This is particularly important for staff who commute considerable distances, or without charging facilities at home

Destination Charging

Enable users to charge their vehicles whilst conducting other tasks (e.g. whilst shopping or at a visitor attraction). They are commonly found in car parks where vehicles are likely to stay for longer than 30 minutes

En-route Charging

Normally offering rapid and ultra-rapid speeds, en-route charge points are placed in publicly accessible locations along natural routes such as along motorways and at service stations

Table 4‑3: Charge Point Locations

4.9 Next Steps

It is proposed that Blackpool roll out a mix of charge point types at a variety of locations to meet the needs of different users. By monitoring usage of charge points Blackpool will be able to determine how best to meet the needs of users.

5 Blackpool’s Anticipated Charge Point Needs

Chapter at a Glance

This chapter summarises Blackpool’s anticipated EV public charge point needs for 2027 to help Blackpool prepare for the transition to zero emission vehicles.

5.1 Introduction

As identified in our Baseline Evidence Report, Blackpool currently has low EV uptake with only 0.6% of privately registered vehicles in Blackpool currently ULEVs and 396 recorded registered (private and company) BEVs and PHEVs in 2021[10]. Blackpool also currently has low rates of charge point provision; Zap-Map data indicates that there a limited number of charge points in Blackpool, with several of these out of service over a long period at the time of writing[11].

The forecasts make clear that over the coming years Blackpool will see a considerable increase in the volume of EVs on its roads. Modelled data suggests that in 2027 23% of vehicles owned in Blackpool would be EVs (defined as BEVs & PHEVs), rising to 57% in 2032. However, since the baseline assessment was concluded, the political, economic and social outlook for residents and the tourism market in Blackpool has shifted. The UK is experiencing the highest rate of inflation for domestic goods and services since 1990[12]. Predictions from the International Monetary Fund suggest inflation pressures in the UK are likely to persist[13]. An Ofgem survey of 4000 people found that whilst 24% of people were likely to buy a plug-in vehicle by 2027, the proportion of people who are unlikely to buy one because of costs and infrastructure increased by 7%[14]. Recent price increases by EV chargepoint providers and domestic energy bills has lessened the financial case for switching to EV’s[15].

The core purpose of this Strategy is to help Blackpool prepare for the transition by forecasting Blackpool’s anticipated charging needs to 2027.

5.2 Infrastructure Required to 2027

Initial modelling, based on the best possible national sources and predictions[16], suggested that Blackpool would need between 1,597 and 2,787 publicly accessible charge points by 2027 (over the five-year timeframe of this Strategy), with the likelihood being that provision would be at the lower end of this range. Given the scale of the economic shocks since the data was produced, the Council’s Research Team reviewed[17] the findings of the report based on Transport for the North data on vehicle numbers not previously available, which highlighted that the scenario generating the lowest uptake was the most vulnerable to economic shock. This work found that the likely number of chargers needed in Blackpool by 2027 was considerably lower at around 722 (including existing chargers in the town):

Number of chragers
Type of DriverNumber of Chargers

Resident

259

Tourist

447

Commuter

16

Table 5.1: Likely number of chargers needed in Blackpool by 2027

5.3 Next Steps

Forecasting anticipated demand is an important first step. The next step is to utilise the forecasts as an evidence base to leverage Government funding and private sector investment (e.g. from CPOs) to support the delivery of adequate charge point provision in Blackpool. Our aim is to improve provision to consistently meet demand over the five years of the strategy, keeping pace with the adoption by residents and visitors alike.

In the next chapter we will consider how the infrastructure forecasts outlined above could be delivered by considering delivery model options, potential charge point locations and charging solutions for residents without off-street parking.

6 Delivery Opportunities & Options

Chapter at a Glance

This chapter summarises key findings from the Infrastructure Delivery Report to support the successful roll out of charge point infrastructure at key Council owned sites and for residents on-street, whilst leveraging private sector and Government funding.

6.1 Introduction

This Strategy focuses on supporting Blackpool’s response to ensure that the charging needs of residents, commuters, commercial drivers and visitors is both anticipated and addressed through the delivery of adequate charging infrastructure. To support the delivery of adequate charge points, we have identified key opportunity sites which belong to Blackpool Council. We have also identified options which support the charging needs of residents who depend on on-street charging, a group which are currently underrepresented in EV adoption. This has become a key area of Government focus and is aligned with Blackpool’s demographics, where there is a large proportion of residents without off-street parking.

6.2 Opportunity Sites Recommendations

To support the delivery of charge point infrastructure, we have identified key opportunity sites which are within Blackpool Council’s sphere of influence (as displayed in Figure 6‑1). The opportunities include:

  • Council owned car parks
  • Council owned on-street parking bays
  • Bus depot (sharing ultra-rapid charging infrastructure)
  • New developments (utilising the Council’s planning powers to maximise charge point delivery, which presents a significant number of opportunities across the town)

Figure 6‑1: Council Owned Opportunities & Potential New Development Sites

6.2.1 Council Owned Car Parks

Council owned car parks are well used and offer an opportunity to serve charging needs through the provision of slow and fast charge points. Overnight visitors can benefit from slow charging overnight during their visit and fast charge points are suitable for short-stay day visitors or commuters that may want to use their vehicle during the day. As identified during the stakeholder workshops there is also the potential to explore enabling local residents to use charge points installed in council owned car parks to charge their vehicles overnight, thereby providing a charging solution for residents without off-street parking.

We propose that Blackpool Council continues to engage with CPOs to explore which business models are available to support charge point roll out at car park sites, with a view to initially delivering a small number slow and fast dual charge points (charge points with two or more sockets) at as many sites as feasible. Individual site surveys will help determine the feasibility of sites (including electrical considerations).

6.2.2 On-Street Parking Bays

Pay & Display bays, used by visitors and commuters, offer an opportunity to install fast charge points for short stay visitors, business users and commuters, an attractive option for CPOs due to the high turnover of vehicles and highly visible locations. We propose that Blackpool Council continues conversations with CPOs to explore installing fast charge points at visible and strategic locations across Blackpool through the leasing business model option. The Promenade is a key location for visitor parking but we recommend careful consideration of the coastal impact on charge point infrastructure (e.g. durability and maintenance).

6.2.3 Bus Depot

In March 2022, Blackpool successfully secured £20m from the Department for Transport’s Zero Emission Bus Regional Area (ZEBRA) fund to purchase 115 new buses. It is now aiming to leverage additional Government funding to support the sharing of the planned 49 ultra-rapid charge points for buses with the public during the day. This has the potential to provide Blackpool with a significantly sized rapid charging hub site for visitors, commuters and commercial drivers on-the-go. We propose that Blackpool Council continue to explore this opportunity, working closely with the Government and CPOs.

6.2.4 New Developments

There are a number of large developments proposed and underway in Blackpool, presenting the opportunity to leverage planning powers to require charge point provision. A list of proposed developments is outlined in Table 6‑1. We propose that the Blackpool Council Planning Team work closely with developers and other key stakeholders to ensure that these sites commit to and deliver an adequate number of charge points, thereby enabling Blackpool to respond to current and future charge point demand.

Proposed chargers
SchemeNumber of Parking BaysProposed Number of Charge PointsAnticipated Delivery Date

Phase 2 Talbot Gateway

127

None but capacity for 30 charging bays

Summer 2022

Phase 3a Talbot Gateway

24

2

Summer 2024

Phase 3b Talbot Gateway

500 to 600

Capacity for provision to every space (demand dependant)

Summer 2024

Blackpool Central, multi storey

1,306

25

Phase 1 (Construction of multi-story): June 2023

Phase 2 (Visitor attractions): April 2026

Rigby Road Depot
(see Section 4.1.4)

TBC

TBC dependent on load-sharing model with bus chargers (not available for public use)

2024

Blackpool Airport Enterprise Zone (EZ): Amy Johnson Way

46

6-8 rapids

March 2025

Blackpool Airport EZ: Common Edge Sports Pavilion

190

2

Summer 2022

Totals

2,194 - 2,294

114-116

Table 6‑4: Proposed Developments and their Proposed Charge Point Provision

6.3 On-Street Residential Charging

A high proportion (around 65%) of Blackpool’s residents are estimated to not have access to off-street parking, and thereby park their vehicles on local roads. A key priority for this Strategy is considering how we can provide charging solutions for these residents. We recommend that Blackpool consider trialling both conventional on-street residential charging options (e.g. lamp post chargers) and the emerging on-street home charging solutions (e.g. gulley solutions) to determine which solutions best meet user needs.

We propose that Blackpool engage with residents to identify areas where there is demand for on-street residential charging solutions, and which type of on-street residential charging solutions appeal to residents. This will enable the initial roll out of provision to be informed by demand. Accessibility to charge points, including walk time, should be carefully considered as well as not reinforcing existing inequalities wherever possible.

6.4 Blackpool’s Delivery Priorities

To summarise, it is proposed that Blackpool Council (see Table 6-1) prioritise the following opportunities to support the delivery of EV charge points.

Proposal summary
OpportunityDetailProposed Charge Point TypeKey users

Council Owned Car Parks

The Council own & operate 22 car parks across the town which provide 4,656 bays. It is proposed that delivery of charge points is pursued at a number of car park sites

Slow & Fast

· Commuters

· Visitors

· Potential to provide free parking to local residents who use the bays to charge their EV over night (e.g. residents without off-street parking)

On-Street Parking Bays

The Council own and operate over 1,000 on-street parking bays including at highly visible locations e.g. along the promenade. It is proposed that delivery of charge points are pursued at a number of sites

Fast/Rapid

· Commuters (e.g. who may conduct site visits for part of their working day)

· Commercial drivers

· Short stay visitors

· Taxi licencees

Bus Depot

Blackpool has secured funding for 115 new electric buses, which will be charged overnight via 49 ultra-rapid charge points. We encourage Blackpool to continue exploring funding options to support the development of public EV infrastructure to maximise the site location and electrical capacity during the day

Ultra-rapid

· Long stay “park and ride” visitors

On-Street Residential Charge Points

Residents without off-street parking are dependent on public charging solutions, including on-street residential charging solutions. We encourage Blackpool Council to roll out on-street residential solutions (including lamppost chargers and free-standing charge points) to support the needs of these households

Slow

· Residents without off-street parking

New Developments

A significant number of large developments are planned in Blackpool. It is proposed that the Planning Team continue to work closely with developers to ensure that sites commit to and deliver an adequate number of charge points. Existing sites have indicated the potential to deliver 114-116 charge points in Blackpool by 2026

A range of charge points speeds are proposed including rapid

· Commuters

· Visitors

Table 6‑5: Blackpool Council’s charge point delivery priorities

To support a long-term strategic approach to charge point delivery, we recommend that the usage of charge points at these sites is monitored and assessed to help inform future roll out.

6.5 Delivery Models

There are a range of delivery models that can help cover the costs associated with delivering charge point infrastructure. We do not propose that Blackpool pursue a single business model. As per our infrastructure delivery report, we recommend that Blackpool Council consider:

  • Fully funded private sector models
  • Leasing land to CPOs

These two options minimise costs and risks to the Council whilst maximising investment from both Government and private sector funding. We also recommend that the Council seek to work with a range of CPOs. As identified during development of the Strategy, the offers provided by CPOs can vary considerably. At this stage, exploring and trialling delivery models with a variety of lease lengths and arrangements, and comparing the experience of working with a range of different operators will help to build internal expertise and knowledge, whilst providing a means of assessing which business model (or models) and charge points best meet user needs. We recommend that Blackpool continue the conversations initiated during development of this Strategy and seek input and support from the Council’s Procurement Team.

6.6 Energy Constraints & Opportunities

The impact of EV infrastructure on the energy grid is a key consideration for this Strategy, as local capacity constraints impact the viability of sites. In their EV Infrastructure Strategy, the Government recognised the EV transition as both an opportunity and a risk to the UK energy system.

Forecast EV infrastructure modelled on the energy network suggested that a significant proportion of Blackpool’s primary substations will be at risk of constraint breach by 2032, unless mitigating action is taken (for instance substation upgrades). This presents challenges to EV and EV infrastructure roll out in the at-risk areas.

A variety of strategies exist to help reduce peak demands on the grid. These include:

  • Reducing projected total demand (e.g. through mode shift)
  • Flattening the demand peak via technology e.g.:
    • V2G: A technology that allows EV batteries to store energy and then discharge it back to the electricity network when it’s most needed, minimising the grid impact of EV charging and providing grid support
    • Smart Chargers: These communicate with the EV, the charging operator and the utility company through data connections to optimise how and when the battery draws power, ensuring that the battery is charged when electricity demand is lower (such as overnight) or when there is lots of renewable energy on the grid
  • Reducing grid peak demand (e.g. partially satisfying demand with locally generated renewable energy)

6.7 Next Steps

We recognise that Blackpool is at an early stage in its journey to zero emission vehicles. As such, we recommend that it pursues a wide and varied approach to charge point provision. This includes:

  • Building relationships with a range of partners (e.g. CPOs)
  • Trialling various solutions (including charge point types, locations and business models for delivery) in order to build up the internal expertise and knowledge that will be required to deliver Blackpool’s net zero ambitions

We recommend that as charging infrastructure is developed and installed, Blackpool Council tracks and assesses infrastructure usage, as lessons learnt can help inform the future strategic direction, including identifying which charge point solutions best meet charge point user needs.

Given the vital role the local energy network will play in supporting the transition to zero emission vehicles, and delivery of the broader net zero agenda, Blackpool Council and key delivery partners will need to work closely with the Distribution Network Operator (DNO).

Rather than attempting to deliver the vision alone, Blackpool Council should harness the support and buy-in from the broader community to make the vision a reality. This item is explored further in the following chapter.

7 Roles & Responsibilities

Chapter at a Glance

In this chapter we propose the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, recognising that Blackpool Council requires support from the broader community and key stakeholders to deliver the ambitions outlined.

7.1 Introduction

To date, the private sector has failed to deliver an adequate number of charge points in Blackpool. Considerable investment is required in charging infrastructure to respond to anticipated charging needs. Whilst Blackpool Council has a clear role - both in terms of supporting delivery on its land, and using its sphere of influence (e.g. the planning process) – it is also evident that Blackpool Council will not be able to deliver this vision alone. It will therefore be essential that Blackpool Council continues to harness the support and buy in from the broader community (as identified during development of this Strategy) to make the vision a reality. This includes maximising funding and investment from central Government e.g. via the On-street Residential Chargepoint scheme (ORCs) and Local Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (LEVI) Fund, CPOs and delivery from the local business community including supermarkets and key visitor attractions.

Through the workshops and one-to-one sessions, which were held as part of the stakeholder engagement process (see our Stakeholder Engagement Report for further detail), we identified that key stakeholders are broadly positive about EVs and the UK’s transition towards zero emission vehicles. However, our research also acknowledges that Blackpool is at the early stages of the EV transition. This Strategy therefore presents an opportunity to provide clarity on the role and responsibilities of key stakeholders (both national and locally) in driving the zero emission agenda forward.

7.2 Key Stakeholder Groups

Table 7‑1 outlines the proposed roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders.

Key stakeholder groups
Key Stakeholder GroupStakeholderRoles & Responsibilities

Public Sector

Government

Funding: Government funding, including via contributions from operators, remains vital to support delivery of charging infrastructure

Public Sector

Government

Regulation: Continuing to regulate the market to protect consumers, improve user experience and boost consumer confidence

Public Sector

Government

Strategic Direction: Driving the agenda through developing Strategies and Policies

Public Sector

Government

Support, advice & guidance: Continue to support Local Authorities though the provision of advice and guidance

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Facilitation: support an ongoing dialogue with stakeholders to harness the support and buy-in from the broader community (including with Energy North West (ENW), CPOs, business, community & voluntary sector)

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Signposting: raising awareness about the EV transition (including a local map of charge points and the grants available) amongst the public (including residents, visitors and the business community) using tools such as the Council website and local events

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Strategic Oversight: Through the development of strategies (including the forecasts), signposting & information sharing Blackpool Council can provide a clear vision for the future

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Financing: Securing funding from both Government and the private sector to support the delivery of charge points, and supporting the case for investment in Blackpool. When required (and where budgets allow) Blackpool Council will also invest in charge point delivery

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Access to land: Supporting the delivery of charge points on Council owned land (including car parks, parking bays, and on residential roads)

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Planning: Harness its planning powers to require the installation of EV charge points in new developments 

Public Sector

Blackpool Council (with support from the wholly-owned subsidiaries)

Community Engagement: Promoting and informing local communities about EV’s and the transition away from ICE cars

Public Sector

Other Local Authorities

Knowledge Sharing: To maximise efficiencies, lessons learnt and best practise, neighbouring authorities and authorities UK wide should share information and collaborate (for instance with other coastal authorities who have required charge point solutions which can withstand exposure to sun, salt and sand)

Public Sector

Other Local Authorities

Procurement Efficiencies: Utilising Direct Purchasing Systems (from other Local Authorities or Central Government) to ease and support the procurement process

Private Sector

CPOs

Financing: Many CPOs provide financing options in return for leasing agreements on parking bays

Private Sector

CPOs

Install, Operate & Maintain Charge Points: Provide the technical expertise to support the roll out of infrastructure

Private Sector

Supermarket chains

Delivery: Provision of destination charge points to support the broader network of public charge points

Private Sector

Visitor attractions

Delivery: Provision of destination charge points to support the broader network of public charge points

Private Sector

Local businesses

Delivery: Support charge point delivery via the

· Provision of workplace charge points to allow employees to charge whilst at work

· Provision of charging infrastructure at depots for fleet vehicles

Table 7‑1: Key Stakeholders & their Roles & Responsibilities

7.3 Next Steps

In the following chapters we have proposed recommendations and actions which support an ongoing dialogue with key stakeholders.

8 Key Recommendations

Chapter at a Glance

This chapter summarises the key recommendations proposed during development of this Strategy. This includes continued stakeholder engagement, further energy analysis and ongoing dialogue with CPOs. It also covers some of the broader proposals suggested by stakeholders, but which sit outside of the of the scope of this Strategy.

8.1 Introduction

The research and conversations with stakeholders undertaken during this project have yielded several recommendations for Blackpool Council and key stakeholders to consider as the EV Strategy is rolled out. As identified in the Stakeholder Engagement Summary and the Delivery Report, consideration of charger location, type, delivery model and grid connection opportunities all require careful consideration. Continued engagement with CPOs and the DNO will be essential to establish a delivery model that works for the Council and is compatible with any grid constraints in the area.

8.2 Key Recommendations

Table 8‑1 provides an overview of the various recommendations made to Blackpool Council as we have developed the various documents that inform the Final EV Strategy Report.

Recommendations
TopicItemRecommendation

Energy

1.

All infrastructure delivery partners to utilise smart technologies such as vehicle-to-grid and smart chargers to regulate energy demand

Energy

2.

All infrastructure delivery partners to continue to work closely with the DNO, to manage and mitigate the impact of EV infrastructure on the local energy network

Delivery

3.

We do not propose that Blackpool pursue a single business model. We recommend that Blackpool Council consider:

· fully funded private sector models and

· leasing land to CPOs

These two options minimise costs and risks to the Council whilst maximising investment from both Government and private sector funding

Delivery

4.

Blackpool Council trial various charge point solutions including charge point types and locations, relationships with various charge point providers and business models to build up internal expertise and knowledge and to identify which solutions best meet Blackpool’s needs

Delivery

5.

Blackpool Council’s Planning Team to work closely with developers to ensure that new development sites actively support charge point delivery

Delivery

6.

Blackpool Transport continue to pursue the opportunity to share the planned ultra-rapid charge points at the bus depot with the public during the day

Delivery

7.

Identify residential areas in Blackpool where there is a demand for on-street residential charging solutions and roll out trials in these areas

Delivery

8.

Blackpool Council trial both conventional on-street residential charging options (e.g. lamp post chargers) and the emerging on-street home charging solutions (e.g. Gul-e which provides lower costs per charge) to determine the preferred on-street solution(s)

Delivery

9.

Blackpool Council to periodically map and review the provision of charge points across the town to ensure a strategic and spatial approach to charge point provision, and to avoid EV provision reinforcing existing inequalities

Procurement

10.

Blackpool Council to develop a clear Service Level Agreement with CPOs to ensure any maintenance issues or faults are dealt with swiftly

Procurement

11.

Blackpool Council to utilise Dynamic Purchasing System frameworks to ease the procurement process

Procurement

12.

Blackpool Council to ensure that monitoring processes are embedded into charge point delivery plans through provision of dashboards by CPOs and clear data sharing plans

Procurement

13.

Blackpool Council to seek assurance from CPOs on the ability of charge points to withstand the effects of sun, salt and sand (particularly if placed along the seafront) and incorporate this into specifications

Stakeholder Engagement

14.

Blackpool Council to actively engage with key stakeholders including residents and the local business community to raise awareness about EVs and charge points

Stakeholder Engagement

15.

Blackpool Council to actively engage with key stakeholders (e.g. supermarkets, hotels and car park operators) to support the Strategy through delivery of charge points on their land

Table 8‑7: Key Recommendations for Blackpool Council

8.3 Broader Considerations

As part of the stakeholder engagement process, various groups across Blackpool and Lancashire more broadly were consulted for their views on the roll out of EV technology. A number of opportunities and concerns which were highlighted are outside of the scope of the EV Strategy. We have listed these below so that they can inform broader discussion.

Considerations
ConsiderationDetail

Environmental concerns

There was consideration of the broader environmental impact of EVs. For instance, the need for electricity to be supplied by renewable energy and ethics and sustainability of raw material sourcing

Training and job creation

There are many training and employment benefits to the transition to EVs. Unlocking these could boost training opportunities and generate local jobs. For instance, via harnessing existing links with Blackpool and the Fylde College & Lancashire Energy HQ Campus

Renewable energy generation

Investigation of opportunities for renewable energy generation in Blackpool will help to ease pressure on the grid as well as minimising the environmental impact of charging EVs in the town

Minimising technological risk

Consideration must be given to future proofing procurement of vehicles and infrastructure as both technologies improve over time, ensuring Blackpool does not have obsolete asset. Hydrogen technology was specifically mentioned as a potential market to replace EVs, but this is not relevant for the timescale of this strategy. Future document may need to consider integration of hydrogen fuelling options if applicable (for instance if hydrogen becomes the preferred technological solution for heavy vehicles)

Blackpool as a flagship net zero destination

There is significant potential for Blackpool to become a green hub in the north given its role as a prime tourist destination. For instance, building on its good public transport offering and the ZEBRA funding

Car clubs

EV car clubs could provide a more affordable option for accessing EVS, while also encouraging active travel as a first choice

Motability

There is potential for the Motability scheme to make EVs more affordable to people with disability needs, but a clear implication of this for the accessibility of chargepoints.

Table 8‑8: Broader Considerations Identified during Stakeholder Workshops

8.4 Next Steps

In the following chapter we develop a some of the key recommendations (as outlined above) and develop them into short term priority actions, to help inform prioritisation over the next few years.

9 Key Commitments

Chapter at a Glance

In this chapter we outline Blackpool Council’s key short term commitments which will support delivery of the vision by prioritising actions that will support the roll out of more charge points in Blackpool.

9.1 Introduction

The following EV Action Plan provides a mechanism for reviewing and checking progress to ensure that Blackpool Council is doing everything it can to support delivery of this Strategy.

9.2 Key Commitments

Table 9‑1, 9-2 and 9-3 outlines 12 priority actions which Blackpool Council has committed to, in order to support charge point delivery.

Table 9‑1: Blackpool’s EV Action Plan – Theme: Energy Capacity

EV action plan
IDActionOwnerOutputOutcomeTimeframe

01

Explore opportunities for local renewable power generation relating to provision of charge points

Climate Team

Renewable power directly linked to charging facilities

Increase in viability of charge point schemes

Ongoing

02

Liaise with DNO on site by site basis to determine infrastructure capacity for new charge points

Climate Team

Minimise the need to generate additional network capacity

Increase in viability of charge point schemes

Ongoing

Table 9.2: Blackpool’s EV Action Plan – Theme: Delivery and Charge point location

Action plan themes
IDActionOwnerOutputOutcomeTimeframe

03

Require delivery of charge points in all new developments (both in parking bays & on drives/garages)

Planning Team

Supports the roll out of EV charge points in all new developments

Improve access to charge points

To be embedded in the Emerging Local Plan Part 2 by end of 2022

04

Deliver additional charge points in Council owned car parks, including new developments

Property and Asset Management

Provides at least 40 additional charge point sockets across at least 4 Council owned car parks

Improve access to charge points

March 2025

05

Develop a parking policy which supports the dedicated use of bays for EVs via an enforcement process

Parking Services

Enforcement provides a mechanism to support the appropriate use of charging bays

Improves access to charge points

Summer 2023

06

Deliver at least one live on-street residential charge point trial

Highways Team/Coastal and Environmental Partnerships

Provides at least 10 charge point sockets

Improve access to charge points

Live trial by the end of 2023

07

Pilot provision of charge point sockets at carparks in residential areas

Property and Asset Management

Provides at least 4 additional charge point sockets

Improve access to charge points

March 2024

08

To facilitate and monitor privately-funded chargepoint provision in Blackpool

Climate Team

3 large-scale privately-funded sites in Blackpool

Improve access to charge points

March 2025

09

Submit bids to leverage Government funding for public charge points (e.g. LEVI) including:

· Rigby Road Bus Depot public charging

· Enterprise Zone

Climate Team

Support the delivery of additional charge points

Improve access to charge points

TBC dependent on LEVI fund launch

10

Map and review the provision of charge points & their usage data to support a spatial & strategic approach to charge point provision

Climate Team

Performance reports to Climate Emergency Steering Group

Support a strategic & spatial approach to charge point provision to support inclusion

Annually

Table 9.3: Blackpool’s EV Action Plan – Theme: Stakeholder Engagement (including Education & Awareness)

Action plan engagement
IDActionOwnerOutputOutcomeTimeframe

11

Develop a Council webpage and marketing campaign dedicated to raising awareness about EVs, charging infrastructure and grant funding

Climate Team

Develop webpage

Raising awareness, communicating the vision, providing info about grants etc

December 2022

12

Seek feedback and discuss the EV Strategies key findings with the public and key stakeholders

Corporate Delivery

Town-wide public consultation on the Draft EV Strategy

Ensuring this Strategy meets the needs of the town

December 2022

10 Conclusions & Next Steps

This Strategy has highlighted that Blackpool currently has low ULEV uptake and a low number of charge points, but that within the five-year timeframe of this Strategy Blackpool will see a considerable increase in the volume of EVs (including PHEVs) on its roads. We anticipate that in 2027 23% of vehicles owned in Blackpool will an EV. The key purpose of this Strategy is preparing Blackpool for this transition by working towards ensuring there is adequate infrastructure to respond to demand. This will help future proof the economic well-being of the town by ensuring it can respond to visitor demand – which is of vital economic importance. This Strategy can play a significant role in supporting the Council’s net zero by 2030 commitments for the town given that transport accounts for 19% of the town’s emissions.

Whilst the purpose of this Strategy is anticipating charging infrastructure needs over the five-year life span of this Strategy, we recognise that electrification of transport will not solve all our problems and that a focus on sustainable mode shift remains a key priority.

To support and enable the delivery of the vision outlined in this Strategy, Blackpool Council has committed to the following four key priorities:

  1. Support and enable delivery of charge points on Council owned land: Including at council owned car parks and rolling out on-street residential charging solutions for residents without off-street parking
  2. Leverage funding and financing from the public and private sector to maximise charge point delivery: Blackpool Council will pursue funding and financing opportunities with central Government and the private sector to maximise delivery of charge points
  3. Harness its planning influence: A significant number of large developments are planned in Blackpool. The Planning Team will work closely with developers to ensure that development sites commit to and deliver an adequate number of charge points
  4. Raise awareness about the EV transition and secure buy-in from key stakeholders to support charge point delivery: The Council recognises it has an important role to play in raising awareness about EVs and charge points amongst residents, the local business community and with visitors. The Council will therefore utilise the tools at its disposal including the Council website to signpost the local community to grants and support. It will also actively engage with the business community including visitor attractions, the hotel industry, supermarkets and car park operators to share the vision outlined in this Strategy, and to outline the important role these sectors can play in supporting charge point delivery on their land

Blackpool Council has insufficient resources to address the EV infrastructure challenge alone, therefore collaboration across the public and private sector will be key to successful delivery. An important role for the Council is therefore to cascade the vision outlined in this Strategy and to initiate and harness partnership opportunities, utilising the forecasts as an evidence base for securing investment.

The forecasts anticipate delivery of 1,597 charge points is required by 2027. We acknowledge that Blackpool is an outlier and therefore the forecasts should be treated as indicative figures, which provide a sense of the scale of the challenge. Our intention is to ensure that Blackpool does not get left behind as the UK transitions to EVs, to avoid any detrimental impact to the town’s economy.

Given the high degree of uncertainty around future forecasts we propose that Blackpool consider reviewing the forecast data in 2-3 years’ time to ensure it reflects policy, societal and technological changes.

In the short term, the priority is for Blackpool Council to work with key delivery partners to significantly increase the number of charge points available in the town, to provide a range of charge point infrastructure and to build internal knowledge and expertise on charge points. The Action Plan outlined in Table 9‑1 provides a clear set of priority actions against which progress can be monitored and measured. Blackpool Council commit to monitoring and reviewing these actions on an annual basis.

[1] HM Government (2022) Taking Charge: the EV Infrastructure Strategy Taking charge: the electric vehicle infrastructure strategy (publishing.service.gov.uk)

[2] Vehicle Certification Agency (2021) New Car Fuel Consumption & Emission Figures: Zero & Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEV) | Vehicle Certification Agency (vehicle-certification-agency.gov.uk)

[3] Blackpool Council (2018) Omnibus Visitor Annual Survey Report [Provided by Blackpool Council]

[4] Blackpool Council (2021) Blackpool’s Climate Emergency Action Plan C1682 Climate Emergency Action Plan_Accessible (blackpool.gov.uk)

[5] OZEV (2022) Design Considerations for EV Charge Points: Design considerations for electric vehicle chargepoints - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

[6] ONS (2020) Population Estimates for UK, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland (Mid-2020): https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/datasets/populationestimatesforukenglandandwalesscotlandandnorthernireland

[7] Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (2019) 2019 English IMD

[8] Nomis (Census 2011) Location of usual residence and place of work by method of travel to work https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/wu03uk

[9] City Science (2021) 9 Years Remaining https://www.cityscience.com/download/9-Years-Remaining.pdf?msclkid=624492f8af7c11eca7485ed414fbc32c

[10] Department for Transport, Driver & Vehicle Licensing Agency (2021) Licensed ultra low emission vehicles by local authority (VEH0132): https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/all-vehicles-veh01#licensed-vehicles

[11] Zap-Map (2022) Live EV Charge Point Map Data: https://www.zap-map,com/live/

[12] Office for National Statistics (2022) Consumer Price inflation Consumer price inflation, UK - Office for National Statistics

[13] International Monetary Fund (2022) Table 1 Page 7 World Economic Outlook Update, July 2022: Gloomy and More Uncertain (imf.org)

[14] Ofgem (2021) Consumer Survey 2021 - Electric vehicles (Consumer survey EVs summary 251021 (ofgem.gov.uk)

[15] Fuel Costs per mile ICE vs BEV (pence per mile) August 2022, Katy Duke https://twitter.com/KatyDuke/status/1558077431021445120?t=SVBMBqQO7_cUAtuw1OMoiw&s=03

[16] Data analysis and forecasting report, City Science, June 2022

[17] Addendum, Blackpool Council research team, August 2022

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